Bankruptcy Sell-offs

Borders
With increasingly fierce competition from main rival book store Barnes & Noble and the declining popularity of printed reading materials, Borders could not sustain its operations.  It filed for bankruptcy owing about $178.8 million to its publishers.  After filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, announcing plans to close 200 Borders book stores and cut 19,000 jobs nationwide, it is now holding a liquidation sale with clearance of items at 20% to 40% discounts.
But although you can get items at bargain prices, word has it that the discounts are going to increase even further.  Yet you may not get what you want if you wait because everything is being snapped up right now.
The news of Borders bankruptcy did not get the typical reaction from the market.  Usually, when a big player in any industry falls, the competitors lap up the market share with lower prices.  But Borders’ two biggest competitors, Barnes & Noble and Amazon did not respond with any changes in their prices.  Instead, the market’s reaction was rather restrained, pointing to more of perceived weakness in the industry with the idea “okay, who’s next to fall.”
Borders failure mainly stemmed from their reluctance to go digital.  Their rivals Amazon and Barnes & Noble both have their own e-readers and digital publishing agreements.  Ultimately, Borders’ lack of innovation was the death knell to their business.
Honolulu Symphony
As a result of the Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing of the Honolulu Symphony, dozens of musical instruments and compositions will be auctioned off on March 17, subject to bankruptcy court approval.  The items to be auctioned will be open for bids from around the world thanks to an online live webcast.
The bankruptcy trustee overseeing the Symphony’s case intends to appoint Heritage Global Partners auction house to administer the auction.  According to David Barkoff of Heritage Global Partners, the auction represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because of the prestige of the 110-year old Honolulu Symphony being the oldest symphony west of the Rocky Mountains.
Available for auction is $330,000 worth of musical instruments and related equipment, including two grand pianos, a harpsichord, maracas, chimes, timpani drums and mallets.  Many sound effect tools are also available like the ones that make sleigh bell sounds, taxi horns and whistles of all sorts of sounds.  Also up for sale are office equipment, artifacts, memorabilia and a whole music library of classical music from Bach to Wagner and Hawaiian sheet music.
If you wish to file for bankruptcy protection, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

Bankruptcy Sell-offs Borders With increasingly fierce competition from main rival book store Barnes & Noble and the declining popularity of printed reading materials, Borders could not sustain its operations.  It filed for bankruptcy owing about $178.8 million to its publishers.  After filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, announcing plans to close 200 Borders book stores and cut 19,000 jobs nationwide, it is now holding a liquidation sale with clearance of items at 20% to 40% discounts. But although you can get items at bargain prices, word has it that the discounts are going to increase even further.  Yet you may not get what you want if you wait because everything is being snapped up right now. The news of Borders bankruptcy did not get the typical reaction from the market.  Usually, when a big player in any industry falls, the competitors lap up the market share with lower prices.  But Borders’ two biggest competitors, Barnes & Noble and Amazon did not respond with any changes in their prices.  Instead, the market’s reaction was rather restrained, pointing to more of perceived weakness in the industry with the idea “okay, who’s next to fall.” Borders failure mainly stemmed from their reluctance to go digital.  Their rivals Amazon and Barnes & Noble both have their own e-readers and digital publishing agreements.  Ultimately, Borders’ lack of innovation was the death knell to their business. Honolulu Symphony As a result of the Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing of the Honolulu Symphony, dozens of musical instruments and compositions will be auctioned off on March 17, subject to bankruptcy court approval.  The items to be auctioned will be open for bids from around the world thanks to an online live webcast. The bankruptcy trustee overseeing the Symphony’s case intends to appoint Heritage Global Partners auction house to administer the auction.  According to David Barkoff of Heritage Global Partners, the auction represents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because of the prestige of the 110-year old Honolulu Symphony being the oldest symphony west of the Rocky Mountains. Available for auction is $330,000 worth of musical instruments and related equipment, including two grand pianos, a harpsichord, maracas, chimes, timpani drums and mallets.  Many sound effect tools are also available like the ones that make sleigh bell sounds, taxi horns and whistles of all sorts of sounds.  Also up for sale are office equipment, artifacts, memorabilia and a whole music library of classical music from Bach to Wagner and Hawaiian sheet music. If you wish to file for bankruptcy protection, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

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Bankruptcy Exits

Gen Art
New York-based talent agency Gen Art, known for placing clients in roles in the fashion, film and music industries, announced it will emerge from bankruptcy recently.  The company was purchased by Sandow Media and one of the first things they did was make two former senior executives co-presidents at the company.  The new owners will reimburse investors who lost money when the company first filed for bankruptcy.  Also in the plans are a larger digital platform, crafting webisodes and developing pilots for a reality television program.
General Motors
After 2 years in bankruptcy, General Motors (GM) has come out of it with a vengeance.  For the first time since 2004, the company has made a profit of $4.7 billion in 2010.  This figure represents its highest profit in a decade.  Dan Ackerson, GM’s Chief Executive and Chairman, was pleased to announce four quarters of consecutive profits for last year.
The company also returned to the stock market last year with a $23.1 billion initial public offering (IPO) in November.  45,000 union workers stand to receive profit sharing checks amounting to $4,300 on average.
In the fourth quarter of 2011, GM earned $510 million compared with a loss of $3.5 billion in the same period in 2009.  Revenue for the calendar year was $135.6 billion.
However, the situation in its European operations is not so bright.  Its division in Europe, including Vauxhall in Britain continued to do badly.  Its collective losses amounted to almost $1.8 billion last year.  This includes $700,000 in restructuring costs as the company axed 5,000 jobs.  The company said it hopes to return to the black by this year.  In Europe, GM lost close to $600 million in the fourth quarter of 2010, although it was an improvement from the $800,000 lost in the same quarter the year before.  GM is currently contemplating whether to shut down its Luton plant, which it operates as a joint venture with Renault.  The JV arrangement expires in 2013.
At the same time, GM’s sales rose 12.2% in 2010, selling 8.39 million vehicles.  This number was only 30,000 less than Toyota, and would have allowed GM to overtake the Japanese carmaker as the world’s largest.  Particularly satisfying were the sales in China that rose 28.8% in 2010 compared to the year before.  GM now sells more vehicles in China than they do in the US.
Bankruptcy can save you financially just like it did for Gen Art and GM.  If you want to use bankruptcy to improve your financial situation, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

NFL Star Filed for Bankruptcy

Former Chicago Bears star Dave Duerson, who committed suicide recently had filed for bankruptcy protection in September 2010.  In his bankruptcy filing, Duerson listed a federal court judgment his food company won in 2004 as one of his assets.  The judgment amounted to $34.5 million and was given against a company that filed for bankruptcy in 2005.  Ironically, the amount was never collected.  Without the awarded amount, Duerson would have been in debt by up to $14 million, largely due to the failure of his food former company, Duerson Foods LLC that went into receivership in 2006.  Duerson told the Chicago Tribune in 2007 that he was still hopeful to collect the judgment.
In his bankruptcy filing, Duerson stated that his ex-wife is entitled to 30% to 50% of whatever judgment is collected.
Last December, Duerson’s wife Alicia claimed that he owed her $70,000 and had not listed some of his assets like his two Super Bowl rings and a large bronze trophy for being named the Walter Payton Man of the Year in 1987.  Duerson’s lawyer, Zach Shelomith, explained the missing items from Duerson’s list of assets when he said their ownership had been transferred some time ago to the Dave Duerson Foundation and that the mementos would be displayed in a sports Hall of Fame in Indiana or Illinois.
Shelomith said Duerson was negotiating with this ex-wife to settle their dispute.
Other assets listed by Duerson included $846 in his checking account and a 2002 Cadillac Escalade that had been driven 140,000 miles worth $5,750.
In 2007, after his food company was forced into receivership, Duerson’s financial problems began to escalate.  His Highland Park home, which he mortgaged to help finance his food company operations, was issued with a foreclosure notice.
Earlier in April 2004, Duerson sued a freezer supplier that he believed had caused a lot of difficulties for his company and himself.  The Eastern Wisconsin district court awarded Duersosn $34 million in damages when it gave judgment to him.
In one October filing, Duerson said he was trying to end a $379-a-month storage lease in Morton Grove where he kept a Chippendale desk he bought in 1998, a remote-control “high-rise bar”, a dismantled 1987 Brunswick pool table, four black metal bar stools and two black directors’ chairs.  In his memo to the court, Duerson explained his difficulty in selling or giving away the items.  What was in storage also included his sons’ two trumpets from grade school.

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Bankruptcy Happenings

Bankruptcies Down January
Statistics show that the number of bankruptcies nationwide has fallen in January, continuing the downward trend since bankruptcies peaked in last year.  In January, bankruptcy filings were about 90,000, significantly lower than the 100,000+ every month since January 2010.  In December itself, the number of bankruptcies fell by 22%.
But before you start celebrating the end of the recession, take note of what some experts say.  For instance, Susan Muzila, Morgan Drexen’s Strategic Director of Planning says, “The decline in bankruptcy filings during January doesn’t really show that there is improvement in the economy, January is typically the lowest filings month of the year.  However, filings are down 9% on that of last year so this is a much better indicator on the economy of the US.”
The average proportion of filings nationwide is about one in every 3,000 people or 305 filings for every one million adults.  Most states recorded a drop in the number of filings this year, with the exception of California, Utah, Idaho and Delaware, which was the state with the highest increase at 18%.
Not surprisingly, many of those who filed for bankruptcy had high medical bills or credit card debts to settle.  But among them, there are those who took the step of hiring a bankruptcy lawyer to handle their filing.  Hiring a bankruptcy lawyer is a crucial step in making a successful bankruptcy application.
If you wish to hire a bankruptcy lawyer to help you file for bankruptcy, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.
Bankruptcy does not Deter Catholic Stewardship Appeal
The Catholic Archdiocese in Milwaukee organized its annual stewardship appeal in the midst of its application for bankruptcy due to numerous sex abuse claims by individuals against its clergy.  The stewardship appeal is somewhat of a referendum of sorts on all the church and its ministries stand for.
The Archdiocese’s latest statistics show that about 22% of Southeast Wisconsin’s total Catholic population of about 600,000 parishioners gives towards the annual fund drive.  This year’s target is to collect $7.7 million, unchanged over the last 3 years.  Last year, the collection fell $900,000 short of the target, which was largely attributed to the economic recession.  The year before that, collections exceeded the target by $200,000.   How the bankruptcy filing will affect collections this year remains to be seen.
According to the Archdiocese, stewardship funds cannot be used to settle sex abuse claims, something that lawyers for the claimants are likely to challenge.

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Governors Oppose Bankruptcy for States

On the ongoing debate in Congress regarding legislation to allow states to seek federal bankruptcy protection, the governors of the respective states have got this to say – “We don’t want any of it” (paraphrase mine).  For example, Utah governor had this to say at a panel of the state of public finance at the National Governors Association (NGA) winter meeting, “Suggestions have been brought forward and some speculation that states are teetering on the brink of bankruptcy.  I’m here to say I believe that’s a dangerous development.  It has risks to our municipal markets, to those who invest in our states wondering about the economic viability of our states.  This is coming from incomplete and in many times inaccurate information.”
Herbert chairs the NGA and opines that Congress’ deliberations on giving the states the option of bankruptcy will do nothing but bring jitters to the marketplace and may trigger an interest rate hike not to mention increase the cost of state government.
Congress has already held hearings to consider legislation for allowing states to file for bankruptcy.  Advocates for the idea including prominent GOP lawmakers, Newt Gingrich and Jeb Bush say that allowing bankruptcy gives state governments the chance to reorganize their finances without being encumbered by union obligations.  Gingrich and Bush wrote, “In such a reorganization, a state could propose to terminate some, all or none of its government employee union contracts and establish new compensation rates, work rules, etc.  The lucrative pay and benefits packages that government employee unions have received from obliging politicians over the years are perhaps the most significant hurdles for many states trying to restore fiscal health.”
At the same time, having bankruptcy as an option means the state governments do not have to rely on the federal government for bailouts as a solution to their financial problems.  But the governors at the NGA view bankruptcy as a bane rather than boon to their economic development.
“The reality for all of us is this whole conversation about bankruptcy has chilled some of the economic development conversation,” North Carolina Governor Bev Perdue said.  She went on to state, “These are dangerous times that we live in when we have people fueling things that really can hurt our states’ economic bases. Bankruptcy … is simply not an option that any governor would ever pursue.”
Most financial experts believe, however, that the prospect of bankruptcy for states is remote.

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Giordano’s files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection

Giordano’s the pizza chain famous for its stuffed pizzas has filed for bankruptcy protection.  But the Chicago-based pizza chain will continue to remain open after the bankruptcy court allowed the company to borrow $36 million in bankruptcy loans.

The pizza restaurant’s financial problems were mainly the result of the property market crash in 2007.  Giordano’s is owned by the Apostolou family who also owns a real estate company called Randolph Partners LLC which operates primarily in Illinois and Florida.  Randolph Partners owes the Fifth Third Bank $45.7 million after it defaulted on its loans due to its inability to lease or sell properties for the last few years.

Giordano’s had its beginnings in 1974, being founded by Efren and Joseph Boglio, two brothers from Italy.  In 1988, the restaurant was bought over by John and Eva Apostolou.  Five years ago, the Apostolous expanded their business outside Illinois when they opened 6 restaurants in Florida.  There are presently more than 55 Giordano’s restaurants in Illinois and Florida.  12 of the restaurant’s premises are owned by Randolph Partners while the others are leased from third party landlords.  At the same time, Giordano’s owns American Foods in Mount Prospect from where the restaurant buys its food products.  The Apostolous filed 33 bankruptcy petitions on all their businesses.

Giordano’s bankruptcy filing came the same week as Borders who also filed for Chapter 11 recently.  But unlike Borders, Giordano’s will remain open after receiving a $36 million loan from the Fifth Third Bank.  The money will be for paying employees and vendors and was given on condition that the Apostolou family must restructure its companies, sell off Randolph Partners assets and possibly sell Giordano’s as well.

If you or your business are interested in filing for bankruptcy protection, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.  Bankruptcy is not the end of the road for your business but can be the beginning of a new chapter.

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    Amish Group Wants Bankruptcy Case Dismissed

    The Amish are a close-knit communal Christian sect that lives according to the principles of the Bible.  In an extraordinary bankruptcy case, members of the Amish community in Sugarcreek, Ohio are requesting their bankruptcy case to be dismissed by the judge.  A total of 2,900 creditors from 29 states, mostly Amish invested $33 million into a company called A&M Investments under the control of Morgan Beachy, an Amish himself.  From 1986 to June 2010, Beachy sold investment contracts that were purported to be used to purchase risk-free U.S. government securities, but instead made speculative investments.

    This is a classic case of affinity fraud.  77-year old Beachy filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in June last year in a court in the Northern District of Ohio.  Out of the $33 million entrusted to him, he has less than $18 million left.  The media has been drawing comparisons between Beachy and Bernard Madoff who ran a $50 billion ponzi scheme since the early 90s because of the long periods both men deceived investors into thinking that their investments were making money.

    The Amish believe that by taking charge of their case themselves, they would be able to distribute the money owed to them more effectively.  About 2,550 of the creditors or 94% are in favor of dismissal of their case.  The bankruptcy court received 67 filings containing multiple form letters from them.  One such letter stated, “I take strong objection to my investment in A&M Investments being made the subject of a bankruptcy proceeding, because my participation as a creditor is abhorrent to deeply held spiritual principles on which my family and I have based our way of life.”

    In their application to strike out the case, the Amish have proposed an “Amish Alternative Plan” in which a group of the community’s leaders will be entrusted to distribute the assets worth $18 million “based on Christian principles of love and care for the poor and needy.”

    In his own filing, Beachy also applied to dismiss the bankruptcy case.  In his filing, Beachy stated, “After initiating these bankruptcy proceedings, I consulted with community and religious leaders and have decided that I no longer wish to participate in these proceedings.”

    It was common for the Amish to pull their resources together (as they did when they invested with Beachy) and settle disputes among themselves.  It also appears that Beachy did not pocket the money himself nor live a lavish lifestyle.

    On  the other hand, the bankruptcy trustee and the SEC filed their motions to oppose the Amish’s application to strike out the bankruptcy case stating that not all the creditors were Amish and expressing concerns that the distribution might not be impartial.

    If you wish to file for bankruptcy, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

    Borders Bankruptcy Puts Paid to Ackman Merger

    Borders Bankruptcy Puts Paid to Ackman Merger
    William Ackman, founder of Pershing Square Capital Management LP, a hedge fund firm will likely be dealt a double blow by the bankruptcy of Borders Inc.  As a major shareholder, he might see his stake in the bookstore chain wiped out and his proposed plan to merge Borders with Barnes & Noble is not likely to materialize.
    In December last year, Ackman sought to help Borders purchase Barnes & Noble.  But Barnes & Noble was not likely to agree to a merger because Borders did not have a strong presence in the digital reader market and desirable real estate.  Now Borders has filed for bankruptcy last month and is set to close some 200 of its stores nationwide.  This turn of events is likely to see Barnes & Noble gain a big proportion of the $550 million in book sales arising from the bankruptcy of Borders.
    According to court papers, Pershing owns about 31.3% of Borders public shares.  Pershing bought 5.1 million Borders shares in 2006 when it was trading at between $18 and $20 per share.  The value of Borders shares held by Pershing was at its highest in March 2007 at $173.3 million.  Ackman said Pershing lost about $125 million on its investment in Borders.
    Borders market value has shrunk by more than $3 billion since 1998.  The second-largest book retailer in the US started losing business when it failed to adapt as customers switched to online purchasing and digital reading.
    In March 2008, Borders put itself up for sale and speculation was that Barnes & Noble would buy it.  At that time, Pershing owned stakes in both companies.  But by November of that year, Borders called off its offer for sale after failing to secure a buyer.  Pershing in turn sold its interest in Barnes & Noble in December 2008.  Ackman then approached Leonard Riggio, chairman of Barnes & Noble and Ronald Burkle, a major shareholder about the possibility of merging the two companies.  Riggio disagreed with the idea because he did not want to invest in any more retail space.
    Borders bankruptcy is expected to result in about $550 million in sales up for grabs as its customers may shop elsewhere.  This may benefit Barnes & Noble or it may go digital as companies like Apple and Sony battle for more market share in the ebook business along with Amazon.
    If you are considering filing for bankruptcy, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

    Borders Bankruptcy Puts Paid to Ackman Merger William Ackman, founder of Pershing Square Capital Management LP, a hedge fund firm will likely be dealt a double blow by the bankruptcy of Borders Inc.  As a major shareholder, he might see his stake in the bookstore chain wiped out and his proposed plan to merge Borders with Barnes & Noble is not likely to materialize. In December last year, Ackman sought to help Borders purchase Barnes & Noble.  But Barnes & Noble was not likely to agree to a merger because Borders did not have a strong presence in the digital reader market and desirable real estate.  Now Borders has filed for bankruptcy last month and is set to close some 200 of its stores nationwide.  This turn of events is likely to see Barnes & Noble gain a big proportion of the $550 million in book sales arising from the bankruptcy of Borders. According to court papers, Pershing owns about 31.3% of Borders public shares.  Pershing bought 5.1 million Borders shares in 2006 when it was trading at between $18 and $20 per share.  The value of Borders shares held by Pershing was at its highest in March 2007 at $173.3 million.  Ackman said Pershing lost about $125 million on its investment in Borders. Borders market value has shrunk by more than $3 billion since 1998.  The second-largest book retailer in the US started losing business when it failed to adapt as customers switched to online purchasing and digital reading. In March 2008, Borders put itself up for sale and speculation was that Barnes & Noble would buy it.  At that time, Pershing owned stakes in both companies.  But by November of that year, Borders called off its offer for sale after failing to secure a buyer.  Pershing in turn sold its interest in Barnes & Noble in December 2008.  Ackman then approached Leonard Riggio, chairman of Barnes & Noble and Ronald Burkle, a major shareholder about the possibility of merging the two companies.  Riggio disagreed with the idea because he did not want to invest in any more retail space. Borders bankruptcy is expected to result in about $550 million in sales up for grabs as its customers may shop elsewhere.  This may benefit Barnes & Noble or it may go digital as companies like Apple and Sony battle for more market share in the ebook business along with Amazon. If you are considering filing for bankruptcy, call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

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    Borders Bankruptcy Good News for Some, Bad News for Others

    Borders Inc. which has recently filed for bankruptcy protection is closing about 200 out of 642 of its stores nationwide.  This represents about 30% of its total number of stores.  This has inevitably made some prime real estate vacant.  In metro Atlanta, for example, where 5 Borders stores will be closed, the property previously occupied by them is expected to be filled relatively quickly.
    The five stores are located at 3101 Cobb Parkway in Atlanta, 1605 East-West Connector Road in Austell, 1705 Mall of Georgia Blvd. in Buford, 605 Ernest W. Barrett Parkway in Kennesaw and 3630 Peachtree Parkway in Johns Creek.  In addition to these five, Borders has already closed two other stores earlier.
    The immediate vacancy of these properties that have good visibility, ample parking space and easy access is good news for retailers who wish to enter or expand into the Atlanta market.
    On the other hand, the Borders bankruptcy is having a negative impact on their publishers.  Many publishers who did business with Borders are unsecured creditors.  As such, many have not expressed optimism of getting paid their dues.
    One such publisher, Peachtree Publishing has all but given up hope of getting back the $30,000 Borders owes them.  This amount represents about 3.5% of company sales, prompting Peachtree to sell more to schools and libraries.  Peachtree stopped selling books to Borders since the beginning of the year.
    Likewise, August House publisher has also stopped doing business with Borders for the last 18 months.  Its president, Steve Floyd said he prefers to lose out on the business rather than no be paid for it.  Some of the titles carried by August House include ‘Stone Soup’ and ‘Uglified Ducky’.  Even August House’s insurer stopped insuring their shipments to Borders.
    Borders Group president Mike Edwards said that the bookstore chain had to file for bankruptcy due to lower customer spending and a lack of liquidity.  But he concluded that this “decisive action” will give Borders the chance to reorganise itself as a successful business for the long term.
    If you or your business would like to file for bankruptcy protection, please call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.  Bankruptcy is your right and might just save your business.

    Oriental Trading Exits Bankruptcy

    Last summer, Oriental Trading Co. filed for bankruptcy.  After only 6 months, the company has emerged from bankruptcy protection as a smaller but more robust company.  Its CEO, Sam Taylor is confident the company will grow profitably as the economy improves.

    But back in the fall of 2008, the picture was not so rosy.  Oriental had debts amounting to $720 million, which was largely due to the $1 billion cost of acquisition of the company by Carlyle Group of New York City in 2006.  As time went on, the prices of supplies like imported goods, paper and postage went spiraling upwards.  Consumers began tightening their belts and discretionary spending all but dried up.

    The company laid off workers down to about 2,000 and reduced expenses, yet did not attain enough sales to keep up with interest payments on its debts.  In May 2010, the company could not pay its loans and in August it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

    Last week, Oriental Trading announced that it was exiting bankruptcy with $220 million in debts, a 70% reduction from its original amount which Taylor said will allow the company to continue operating with profits.

    Carlyle Partners owned 68% of the company while Brentwood Associates of Los Angeles, the previous owner owned about 24%.  The remaining shares of the company were owned by about 25 individuals or investment companies.  After reorganization, the new owners are mostly the holders of the original debt.  Taylor declined to specify who they are but said there’s now no single majority owner.  He intends to name the new board of directors soon in the presence of the new owners.

    Taylor said that the recalls of imported toys for safety reasons lately were not why the company filed for bankruptcy, neither were the legal problems faced by former owner Terry Watanabe.  Watanabe was indicted over Las Vegas gambling debts and has not been involved with the company since 2000.  His charges were subsequently dropped and the case moved to arbitration.

    Taylor also commended the staff of Oriental Trading who worked relentlessly despite the recession, adding some 6,000 new products last year, improving the website, stepping up on shipping productivity and winning the approval of its customers.  The company counts businesses, non-profit organizations, churches, schools, individuals and teachers as some of its loyal customers.  A new database for customers will enable Oriental to better target more customers with “the right product, the right catalogue”.

    Oriental’s operations have registered profits despite the recession excluding interest payments.  Its sales turnover has increased over the last 12 months although it has not attained pre-recession levels yet.

    If you have any questions regarding bankruptcy or wish to file for bankruptcy, please call us at (813) 200 4133 for a free consultation.

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